Archive for April, 2011

Item of the Week: Salammbô by Schmied

April 28, 2011

When Ward Ritchie died in 1996, he bequeathed his personal library to the Clark. Amongst its many treasures was a collection of works by François-Louis Schmied, a Parisian book artist and printmaker with whom Ritchie studied during the 1930’s. Schmied’s mastery of the xylographic process, his use of color, and his sense of pattern and sequence is unparalleled in the world of the livre d’artiste.

Bit by bit, the Clark Library has been able to add works produced or illustrated by Schmied, and our latest acquisition is the 1923 edition of Gustave Flaubert’s Salammbô. Printed in a limited edition of 1,030 copies, our copy is no. 446 of 850 that are printed on “Velin de pur Chiffon des Papeteries de Voiron.” The text was printed by Frazier-Soye for “Le Livre.” The book was originally bound in navy wrappers with the title stamped in silver, but this copy has been sensitively rebound into half vellum with marbled paper boards and endpapers. The aubergine, brown, pink, violet, navy blue, and lavender colors of the marbling has been enhanced with gold for even more richness. The title on the spine is in manuscript and includes a charming pen and ink drawing, presumably of Salammbô herself. The original paper wrapper has been bound in.

For more information on Schmied, we recommend the book Art Deco : the Books of François-Louis Schmied, Artist / Engraver / Printer : with Recollections and Descriptive Commentaries on the Books by Ward Ritchie ; with a preface by Lawrence Clark Powell. Published by the Book Club of California in 1987. To see more of his work, come for a visit.

Item of the Week: Circus!

April 21, 2011

In early April, the Clark Library welcomed former head librarian Bruce Whiteman back for memorable afternoon in the drawing room. After the formal events finished, a gift was presented to the Clark in honor of Bruce.  It is the 5th publication of Shanty Bay Press and includes some dynamically beautiful illustrations by Walter Bachinski.

Circus: the Artist as Saltimbanque, is an ode to the relationship the literary and visual arts have to the world of the circus.  Of the book, Bachinski says in the preface, “I have assembled a variety of writings loosely based on the idea of the artist and the circus. I have created a cycle of pochoirs and linocuts inspired by the texts…I visualize this book as a presentation that is similar to an actual visit to a circus”  The texts include pieces by Guillaume Apollinaire, Mark Twain, Jules LaForgue, Charles Baudelaire, Henry Miller and more.

This gift was very generously presented to us by a few Southern California Antiquarian Booksellers, the staff of the Clark Library, and the Center for 17th & 18th Century Studies.  It is a marvelous addition to our collections.

Front Cover

Title Page

Illustration

Colophon

King James Bible Exhibition Opening

April 20, 2011

Last Friday afternoon the Clark Library open its doors to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible with an exhibition entitled: Bible. English. Authorized.  Following are some photographs snapped during the opening.

The exhibition, the weather, and the company were all wonderful.  We are indebted to Curtis and Douglas Dombek for lending us their copy of the King James Bible for the occasion.  Many, many thanks to them!  Thank you to everyone else who came out for the event as well.  A lovely time was had by all.

If you were not able to make it to the opening, there is still time: the exhibition will be on view through June 30, 2011.

Don’t forget the King James Bible!

April 13, 2011

This Friday, April 15th, 4-7  pm…

Bible. English. Authorized:

Celebrating 400 Years  of the King James Bible

(at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library)

Title page

Please join us as we commemorate one of the most important publishing ventures in the western world.

King James the First was nothing if not determined. When he ascended the English throne in 1603 the idea of a new translation of the Holy Bible was making its way through parliament. He called together the privy council, a group of bishops, and assorted learned men to Hampton Court in January of 1604 to discuss ecclesiastical matters. What started as an agenda of both reformation and reconciliation evolved into an airing of grievances r esulting in a resolution to create a new translation of the Holy Bible. This mighty endeavor could create a unified country based on national pride, Protestantism, and royal authority. That, at least, was the hope. Seven years (and fifty translators) later, the King James Bible was published by Robert Barker and the English-speaking world has never been the same.

Drawing on the rich collections of the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, the exhibition will include both contemporary and modern works and show how this new translation has continued to influence biblical scholarship, bibles, and the people who read them.

Exhibition on view April 11- June 30, 2011.

 

Item of the Week: An Eventful Weekend!

April 8, 2011

Last weekend was a busy one for the Clark.

On April 2nd, we were thrilled to have John Wilson Foster here from across the pond, giving a lecture on Oscar Wilde entitled “Green Carnations: Wilde, Culture, and Crime.” You can read a description of the lecture topic in an earlier Clog post here.  The lecture was most enjoyable, as was the reception that followed.

On Sunday the 3rd, we were so happy to welcome back our former head librarian and celebrate “An Afternoon with Bruce Whiteman.” Bruce entertained us with a recounting of some of his favorite acquisitions while at the Clark, stories of books that “got away,” a poetry reading, and piano recital as well!  It was quite a tour de force.  We thank Bruce for traveling to be with us once again, and hope he will return again soon, as he is greatly missed in the Los Angeles rare books community.

Below, you can view a gallery of images from both of last weekend’s events.

Thank you to all who came out to both events this weekend, we love seeing old friends – and making new ones.

Exhibition Opening at the Clark Library

April 5, 2011

Bible. English. Authorized:
Celebrating 400 Years  of the King James Bible
(at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library)

Friday, April 15,  4:00-7:00 p.m.

Please join us as we commemorate one of the most important publishing ventures in the western world.

King James the First was nothing if not determined. When he ascended the English throne in 1603 the idea of a new translation of the Holy Bible was making its way through parliament. He called together the privy council, a group of bishops, and assorted learned men to Hampton Court in January of 1604 to discuss ecclesiastical matters. What started as an agenda of both reformation and reconciliation evolved into an airing of grievances resulting in a resolution to create a new translation of the Holy Bible. This mighty endeavor could create a unified country based on national pride, Protestantism, and royal authority. That, at least, was the hope. Seven years (and fifty translators) later, the King James Bible was published by Robert Barker and the English-speaking world has never been the same.

Drawing on the rich collections of the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, the exhibition will include both contemporary and modern works and show how this new translation has continued to influence biblical scholarship, bibles, and the people who read them.

Exhibition on view April 11- June 30, 2011.

A Tasty Thank You

April 1, 2011

Today we say a bittersweet goodbye to one of our favorite scholars, Lisa Sarasohn.  This is her third visit to the Clark, so she is a seasoned visitor and is very familiar with the collections.  The current project she’s been working on is “Vermin: A Cultural History of Early Modern England from the Outside in,” and we cannot wait to see it in print!

When Lisa joins the staff for lunch, breaks or for a small chat, she has been a delight. We will miss her presence in the halls, and seeing her take her afternoon walk around the grounds.  Today as a “thank you,” Lisa brought us a bag full of delectable cookies, and a very sweet card.

 

A Thank You treat

Thank YOU, Lisa, and please come back anytime!